Monthly Archives: October 2011

Juárez ready for Día de Muertos

Family members visit a grave in Juárez during the weekend. About 11,000 people went to the municipal cemeteries to clean and decorate loved ones' graves or to pay their respects in advance of the two-day Día de Muertos observance. (Photo courtesy the city of Juárez)

Thousands expected in tributes to departed loved ones

Mike Scanlon

A cap of the Juárez city Transit Police adorns an alter at Municipal Traffic Department's office. Employees paid tribute to 27 transit police officers who died in the last year and to all transit officers who have died since 2005. (Photo courtesy the city of Juárez)

Rio Grande Digital

Officials of Ciudad Juárez said Monday they are well prepared for the annual Día de Muertos — Day of the Dead — observances at cemeteries across the city on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Crowds estimated at more than 11,000 people went to various cemeteries on Saturday and Sunday to clean and decorate the graves of departed loved ones or to pay their respects early, according to a city news release.

Holloman’s best prepare for the worst

Senior Airman Suita B. Ika

Members from the 49th Security Forces Squadron advance toward the Mental Health Clinic Oct. 27 during a base-wide active shooter exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Veronica Stamps)

49th Wing Public Affairs

 HOLLOMAN AIR FORCE BASE – In 1994, the hospital at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash., was the scene of a gruesome shooting. Before the gunman was shot dead, he injured several people and claimed the lives of two U.S. Air Force psychiatrists, a dependant spouse, a hospital visitor and an unborn child.

Team Holloman conducted an active shooter exercise Oct. 27 to get up-to-speed on what to do if a similar scenario like the one at Fairchild were to occur here.

Prof foresees automated cargo delivery

Project will lead to FAA guidelines for drones

Tonya Suther

NMSU

Igor Dolgov, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at NMSU. (Courtesy photo)

A New Mexico State University psychology professor is studying drones and the pilots who operate them in order to create guidelines for the Federal Aviation Administration and other agencies.

These guidelines will establish methods so unmanned aircraft systems can be used safely in personal, commercial and academic situations.

“You don’t have the lives of other humans involved in shipping cargo,” Igor Dolgov, an assistant professor of psychology at NMSU said.

Woman accused of ripping off ex-friend’s scalp

Gabriela Nuñez

Las Cruces Police Department

A Las Cruces woman suspected of ripping off part of the scalp of a former friend during an early Saturday morning fight has been arrested and charged with a felony.

NMSU’s Global Connections focuses on Catholic and African festival in Brazil

Afro-Brazilian Syncretism (Congadas) in Minas Gerais: Religion or Folklore, is the third segment of the College of Arts and Sciences Global Connections series, at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 1, in the CMI theater in Milton Hall. Elizabeth Zarur, associate professor of art history, will discuss the history of the colonial celebration and describe the street-dance performances. (Courtesy photo)

Afro-Brazilian Syncretism (Congadas) in Minas Gerais: Religion or Folklore, is the third segment of the College of Arts and Sciences Global Connections series, at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 1, in the CMI theater in Milton Hall. Elizabeth Zarur, associate professor of art history, will discuss the history of the colonial celebration and describe the street-dance performances. (Courtesy photo)

Lecture at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday in Milton Hall theater

Tonya Suther

NMSU

Brazil is the next stop for New Mexico State University’s “Global Connections” series. NMSU art history associate professor Elizabeth Zarur researched Congadas, the Catholic and African festival that honors Our Lady of Rosary and other black Catholic saints, while on sabbatical last year in Sao Joao del-Rei Minas Gerais, Brazil.

Cowgirl Sass & Savvy: Ghost tale from the campfire

Julie Carter is a New Mexico writer and author whose column appears weekly on Rio Grande Digital.

Julie Carter

Phantom horse, phantom rider – the stuff ghost stories are made of.

In J. Frank Dobie’s “Coronado’s Children.,” a tale from cow camp relates the story of a cowboy murdered along the Loma Escondida road. Carrying gold coins in his saddle bags to buy a herd of cattle, he rode out on his cream-colored dun stallion with the black stripe down his back –what the Mexicans called a bayo coyote.

After his second night out, he rose, saddled the lineback dun and went to receive the herd he was purchasing.

UTEP opens Virtual Dementia Tour to public

Laura Acosta

University of Texas at El Paso

November is National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month, and UTEP’s School of Nursing and the Alzheimer’s Association are inviting the public to participate in a free Virtual Dementia Tour from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 4, and from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5, in UTEP’s Simulation Center on the first floor of the new Health Sciences and Nursing Building on Wiggins Road.

Pepper Institute wheels out education tool

New Mexico State University student and Chile Pepper Institute employee Sarah Murphy is seen holding the institute's latest creation, the chile flavor wheel.(NMSU photo by Harrison Brooks)

Justin Bannister

NMSU

Exactly how hot is a Bhut Jolokia chile pepper? What’s the flavor profile of a jalapeno? What are the uses of Hungarian paprika? The answers to each of these questions, and more, can be found on the newest invention from New Mexico State University’s Chile Pepper Institute – their chile flavor wheel.

“We’re just excited about educating the public about chile flavors,” said Paul Bosland, director of the Chile Pepper Institute. “Over the last few years, taste has become more important when talking about chile pepper characteristics.”

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