Monthly Archives: January 2013

NMSU speaker to cover African American leaders

Molefi Kete Asante will speak during NMSU's Black History Month celebration at 7 p.m. Feb. 13 at the Corbett Center Auditorium.(Photo courtesy of NMSU)

Molefi Kete Asante will speak during NMSU’s Black History Month celebration at 7 p.m. Feb. 13 at the Corbett Center Auditorium.
(Photo courtesy of NMSU)

New Mexico State University

Fulbright scholar Molefi Kete Asante will speak about the achievements of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King and the impact they had on the civil rights movement and the election of President Barack Obama as part of New Mexico State University’s Black History Month celebration at 7 p.m. Feb. 13 at the Corbett Center Auditorium. The event will be free and open to the general public.

“I think it’s important that we listen and find out what this means for everyone,” Festus Addo-Yobo, director of NMSU Black Programs. “I think it will be good to see his perspective on Obama being elected.”

Asante is a professor in the Department of African American Studies at Temple University in Philadelphia.

Experts: immigration plans place too much emphasis on border security

Leaders of the immigration reform movement were arrested in Washington DC on On May 1, 2010. At the end of a peaceful demonstration at Lafayette Park, leaders of the immigration reform movement were arrested for a sit-in at the railings in front of the White House in what was intended to be an act of civil disobedience. (Photo courtesy Nevele Otseog under Creative Commons license. License details below)

Leaders of the immigration reform movement were arrested in Washington DC on On May 1, 2010. At the end of a peaceful demonstration at Lafayette Park, leaders of the immigration reform movement were arrested for a sit-in at the railings in front of the White House in what was intended to be an act of civil disobedience. (Photo courtesy Nevele Otseog under Creative Commons license. License details below)

“The border is already quite secure, and the border region is safe both in terms of violent crime statistics and also in terms of people’s perception of it.”

By Jasmine Aguilera

Scripps Howard Foundation Wire

WASHINGTON – Immigration experts who have been pushing for reform  welcome the attention to the issue but say the emphasis on border security and law enforcement are misplaced.

More chimpanzees might depart Holloman

By Renee Blake

Public News Service

ALAMOGORDO — From 2002 to 2011, 266 chimpanzees left the Coulston Foundation in Alamogordo for the Save The Chimps sanctuary in Fort Pierce, Fla. Now another exodus could be in the offing.

Recall effort against Sheriff Joe Arpaio begins

By Valeria Fernández

New America Media

Maricopa County (Ariz.) Sheriff Joe Arpaio. (File photo)

Maricopa County (Ariz.) Sheriff Joe Arpaio.
(File photo)

PHOENIX — A citizen’s group called Respect Arizona filed paperwork at the Maricopa County Elections Department on Wednesday to initiate a recall effort against Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio.

The group would need to gather 335,317 signatures by May 30 of this year in order for the county to call a special election for the sheriff’s office.
Several Republican figures are at the center of the effort to recall Arpaio, who has been re-elected to his post six times since 1993. Williams James Fisher, the chairman of Respect Arizona and a Republican attorney, is expected to announce the recall effort at press conference Thursday morning.

UTEP prof publishes border air pollution study

University of Texas at El Paso

An air pollution study carried out at the international Bridge of the Americas by Hector Olvera, PhD, a research assistant professor at the University of Texas at El Paso’s Center for Environmental Resource Management  and Hispanic Health Disparities Research Center, has been published in a journal affiliated with the prestigious publication Nature

Border agency report reveals internal struggles with corruption

Two Border Patrol agents and a CBP officer stationed at the San Ysidro Port of Entry, help provide security at the outbound lanes of traffic that run from the U.S. into Mexico. They are on constant lookout for large quantities of money and weapons being smuggled out of the U.S.(Photo courtesy of US Customs and Border Protection)

Two Border Patrol agents and a CBP officer stationed at the San Ysidro (Calif.) Port of Entry, help provide security at the outbound lanes of traffic that run from the U.S. into Mexico. (Photo courtesy of US Customs and Border Protection)

By Andrew Becker

Center for Investigative Reporting

Turf battles, internal dysfunction and other troubles have left U.S. Customs and Border Protection grasping to get a handle on corruption and other misconduct within its ranks, according to an internal study that has been kept secret for more than a year.

El Paso Times: Juárez families, neighborhood scarred by 2010 massacre

Three years ago this week, armed killers descended on the Villas de Salvárcar neighborhood of Ciudad Juárez and slaughtered 15 people — mostly students and athletes with no known criminal ties — who were attending a friend’s birthday party.

Immigration reform: A path to citizenship and secure borders

Immigration reform may finally come to fruition. A bipartisan group of U.S. senators unveiled their plan on Monday and today President Obama will lay out his vision.(Photo courtesy of Border Network for Human Rights via Public News Service) CREDIT: BNHR

Immigration reform may finally come to fruition. A bipartisan group of U.S. senators unveiled their plan on Monday and today President Obama will lay out his vision.
(Photo courtesy of Border Network for Human Rights via Public News Service)

John Michaelson

 Public News Service

EL PASO — A plan for immigration reform has been announced by a bipartisan group of U.S. senators, and a mix of optimism and caution is greeting the proposal.

It includes a path to citizenship for people already in the country, says Fernando Garcia, executive director of the Border Network for Human Rights.

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