Monthly Archives: May 2013

Where immigration reform stands now

Elena Shore

(Photo courtesy of New America Media)

(Photo courtesy of New America Media)

New America Media

Last week, the Senate Judiciary Committee passed out of committee an imperfect immigration bill that advocates say is the best shot they have to modernize the U.S. immigration system. The bill now heads to the Senate floor, where the Senate is expected to take it up during the week of June 10.

A revised bill could be ready by the end of June. 

Deportations and economic crisis

Frontera NorteSur

A high-ranking official from the Mexican state of Guerrero told the press that U.S. deportations of his compatriots are having economic consequences. Netzahualcoyotl Bustamante Santin, Guerrero state migrant secretary, said stepped-up deportations mean a significant reduction in the migrant remittances which have emerged as a mainstay of the Mexican economy in recent decades, especially in Guerrero and other impoverished regions of the nation.

NM nuclear watchdog: A fox in national lab henhouse?

Paul Hommert is both director of Sandia National Laboratories and president of the executive board of Sandia Corporation, a for-profit LLC that runs the lab. Courtesy: National Nuclear Security Administration. (Photo courtesy of Public News Service)

Paul Hommert is both director of Sandia National Laboratories and president of the executive board of Sandia Corporation, a for-profit LLC that runs the lab. Courtesy: National Nuclear Security Administration. (Photo courtesy of Public News Service)

Renee Blake

Public News Service

ALBUQUERQUE — The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has assessed a $6 million penalty against Sandia National Laboratories for Sandia’s handling of an incident in Alaska in which two lab employees were seriously injured. However, that is not the only concern for Jay Coghlan, director, Nuclear Watch New Mexico. He noted serious conflicts of interest for top executives at Sandia and other nuclear laboratories.

For instance, Coghlan said, Sandia’s director, Paul Hommert, also chairs the executive board of Sandia Corporation, the for-profit company that runs the lab.

Immigration status affects educational achievement

Penn State 

Mexican American mothers’ formal immigration status affects the educational achievement of their children and even their grandchildren, according to a study written by Penn State and University of California, Irvine, sociologists and released by the US2010 Project at Brown University.

As need for new flood maps rises, Congress and Obama cut funding

FEMA Public Assistance Coordinator Jim Russell (left) and Day County S.D. Highway Supervisor Chuck Fromelt review South Dakota flood damage in 2011. (FEMA Photo Library)

FEMA Public Assistance Coordinator Jim Russell (left) and Day County S.D. Highway Supervisor Chuck Fromelt review South Dakota flood damage in 2011. (FEMA Photo Library)

Theodoric Meyer

ProPublica

As the United States grows warmer and extreme weather more common, the federal government’s flood insurance maps are becoming increasingly important.

The maps, drawn by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, dictate the monthly premiums millions of American households pay for flood insurance. They are also designed to give homeowners and buyers the latest understanding of how likely their communities are to flood.

Activists march 150 miles to protest against corporate lobby

Carl Gibson, 26, left, Cheri Honkala, 50, and Evan Bieder, 20, tried to enter the U.S. Chamber of Commerce building during a protest against lobbying, but police stopped them. (SHFWire photo by Barbara Corbellini Duarte)

Carl Gibson, 26, left, Cheri Honkala, 50, and Evan Bieder, 20, tried to enter the U.S. Chamber of Commerce building during a protest against lobbying, but police stopped them. (SHFWire photo by Barbara Corbellini Duarte)

Barbara Corbellini Duarte

Scripps Howard Foundation Wire

Guillermo Santos, 10, front, Luciano Flores, 19, and Gabriel Elkind, 20, marched 150 miles from Philadelphia to Washington to protest against the U.S. Chamber of Commerce lobbying actions. (SHFWire photo by Barbara Corbellini Duarte)

Guillermo Santos, 10, front, Luciano Flores, 19, and Gabriel Elkind, 20, marched 150 miles from Philadelphia to Washington to protest against the U.S. Chamber of Commerce lobbying actions. (SHFWire photo by Barbara Corbellini Duarte)

WASHINGTON – Guillermo Santos, 10, walked 150 miles from Philadelphia to Washington bringing letters that his classmates wrote for President Barack Obama, asking him to stop budget cuts affecting public schools.

He was with a group of activists who ended their six-day march Friday with a rally in front of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The protesters rallied against the chamber’s lobbying efforts in support of multinational corporations.

Congress aims to stop 90 percent of illegal border crossings

Barbara Corbellini Duarte

Scripps Howard Foundation Wire

WASHINGTON – A group of House members wants to ensure border security before discussing comprehensive

Rep. Loretta Sanchez, D-Calif., proposes an amendment to use biometric identification to monitor documented immigrants from their entrance in the country, through airports, ports or borders, until they leave. (SFHWire photo by Barbara Corbellini Duarte)

Rep. Loretta Sanchez, D-Calif., proposes an amendment to use biometric identification to monitor documented immigrants from their entrance in the country, through airports, ports or borders, until they leave. (SFHWire photo by Barbara Corbellini Duarte)

immigration reform.

On Wednesday, members of the House Homeland Security Committee amended and approved the Border Security Results Act of 2013 and sent it to the floor.

“We have seen the promises of border security coupled with immigration reform go unfulfilled in the past,” Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, the committee chair, said. “If Congress again addresses immigration changes without focusing on the root of the problem we will undoubtedly repeat this debate a decade from now.”

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