Monthly Archives: June 2013

Border leaders slam militarization

Besides roughly doubling the size of the Border Patrol from 20,000 to 40,000 agents,  Hoeven-Corker, named after its Republican  sponsors, would add 700 miles of border fencing, increase drone and high-tech surveillance and require Department of Homeland security certifications, among other measures, all to the tune of at least $46 billion during the next decade.

Frontera NorteSur

As was predicted, the procedural vote on moving forward the Hoeven-Corker amendment to the U.S. Senate’s immigration reform bill passed by a hefty majority (67-27) on Monday, June 24, paving the way for final approval of the legislation.

Rubio draws fire for proposed language requirement

Stephanie Carroll Carson

Public News Service

MIAMI – Advocates for immigration reform in Florida who have stood by U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., are doing a

Florida Republican Senator Marco Rubio proposed an amendment to his own immigration bill which would require that immigrants demonstrate proficiency in English before they can secure legal immigrant status.  (Photo courtesy of New America Media)

Florida Republican Senator Marco Rubio proposed an amendment to his own immigration bill which would require that immigrants demonstrate proficiency in English before they can secure legal immigrant status.
(Photo courtesy of New America Media)

double-take this week, after the “Gang of Eight” member proposed an amendment to his own immigration bill which would require that immigrants demonstrate proficiency in English before they can secure legal immigrant status.

Pablo DeLeon, a national AFL-CIO field representative in Florida, said no one expected this from Rubio.

AP CEO blasts DOJ phone records seizure

AP President and CEO Gary Pruitt tells an audience at the National Press Club in Washington on Wednesday that the government’s secret seizure of AP phone records violated the government’s own rules and threatened the ability of reporters to do their work. (SHFWire photo by Robert R. Denton)

AP President and CEO Gary Pruitt tells an audience at the National Press Club in Washington on Wednesday that the government’s secret seizure of AP phone records violated the government’s own rules and threatened the ability of reporters to do their work. (SHFWire photo by Robert R. Denton)

Rob Denton

Scripps Howard Foundation Wire

WASHINGTON – Gary Pruitt, the Associated Press’ president and CEO,  railed against the Department of Justice phone records seizure Wednesday in a speech at the National Press Club.

Pruitt said that the seizure of phone records from AP reporters earlier this year has affected their ability to report. He also accused the DOJ of breaking its own rules regarding subpoenas toward the press.

Border militarization by Congress threatens to derail immigration reform bill

The fence separating the United States and Mexico stretches across southern Arizona. (Photo courtesy of US Customs and Border Protection)

The fence separating the United States and Mexico stretches across southern Arizona. (Photo courtesy of US Customs and Border Protection)

“Congress has it exactly backwards — border security conflicts are just a symptom of failed immigration policy. Our elected leaders need to focus on crafting a more efficient, humane immigration system that reduces the pressure for destructive enforcement activities in our fragile borderlands.”

— Randy Serraglio, Center for Biological Diversity

Lively House debate over immigration reform draws protesters

Republicans and Democrats accuse each other of being irresponsible as the House Judiciary Committee met Tuesday to amend a bill on immigration reform, which focuses on strengthening enforcement of federal immigration law. (SHFWire photo by Deanna Del Ciello)

Republicans and Democrats accuse each other of being irresponsible as the House Judiciary Committee met Tuesday to amend a bill on immigration reform, which focuses on strengthening enforcement of federal immigration law. (SHFWire photo by Deanna Del Ciello)

“This bill is heavy-handed and irresponsible. It is so extreme and heinous that this committee can do nothing but reject this bill.”

— Rep. John Conyers Jr., D-Mich.

Deanna Del Ciello

Scripps Howard Foundation Wire

WASHINGTON – Debate over immigration reform took a contentious turn Tuesday as Republicans and Democrats accused each other of being irresponsible, and protesters shouted for reform before being taken out of the room.

The scene was the first meeting of the House Judiciary Committee to “mark up” or amend a bill to get it ready for a vote

Spectators don graduation robes as they watch the proceedings of the House Judiciary Committee’s first meeting to amend an immigration bill. Rep. Bob Goodlatte R-Va., told them that if they wanted to stay in the room, they should remain silent. (SHFWire photo by Deanna Del Ciello)

Spectators don graduation robes as they watch the proceedings of the House Judiciary Committee’s first meeting to amend an immigration bill. Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., told them that if they wanted to stay in the room, they should remain silent. (SHFWire photo by Deanna Del Ciello)

in the House. Markup sessions are usually dull affairs, but that was not the case in a hearing that lasted all day, with recesses so committee members could go to the House floor to vote on other matters.

The bill, commonly referred to as the SAFE Act, focuses on strengthening the enforcement of federal immigration law, which committee Republicans cite as the cause of the broken immigration system. They would give state and local governments the ability to enforce the laws.

The bill would expand the definition of criminal activity that allows people to be deported to include drunk driving, manslaughter and rape. Currently, the law states that crimes such as theft, violence, fraud and prostitution are grounds for deportation.

Rescuing deported aunt from a hole in the Tijuana canals

 Yaveth Gomez

Silicon Valley De-Bug

New America Media | Video

Editor’s Note: When he saw his aunt profiled on a Spanish-language TV news special on ñongos — underground encampments of the deported and homeless built in the canals of the U.S.-Mexico border – Yaveth Gomez knew he had to go save her. The family piled into a car, drove down to the border, and pulled her out of a hole in the ground — literally.

We took Interstate 5 South on a mission to rescue my tía Martha. After 30 years in the United States, she was deported three years ago to Tijuana, the bottom of California – el culo del diablo. We hadn’t heard from her since.

Weather ravages border communities

Frontera NorteSur

In the last two years, Maverick County, Texas, made the list of entities rated by the U.S. Drought Monitor as suffering from extreme or exceptional drought. The classification made farmers in the county on the U.S.-Mexico border eligible for extra assistance from the United States Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service.

But on June 14 and 15, the world changed dramatically. In a 36-hour period, 16.65 inches of rain deluged Maverick, setting off flooding in low-income neighborhoods known as colonias and many other parts of the county.

Pivotal border elections

Frontera NorteSur | Special Report  

Voters in El Paso and Juárez have historic, if elusive, opportunities to influence the futures of two distinct yet inextricably linked sister cities. Although upcoming municipal elections will be held at a time when a convergence of economic, social and environmental forces is laying the groundwork for pivotal 21st century transitions, it’s likely the political outcomes in both cities will be decided by a distinct minority of the electorate.

Powered by WordPress