Monthly Archives: September 2013

New, old grievances rile border residents

The activists passed out literature, signed up new members and stringed rows of posters across the base of the monument to Mexico’s most revered president that assailed the policies of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and his packet of labor, education, energy and tax reforms.

Kent Paterson

Frontera NorteSur

On Sundays, the Benito Juarez Monument in the Mexican border city of Ciudad Juárez is a popular community gathering spot of goods, services, culture and ideas.

Border biometric plan won’t be ready until 2015

Scripps Howard Foundation Wire

WASHINGTON – The number of foreign nationals who have overstayed their visas in the U.S. remains unknown, and Congress is pressuring the Department of Homeland Security for a solution.

Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-Texas, questions the value and costs of the biometric exit system at a hearing Thursday. Department of Homeland Security officials estimate upward of $3 billion for the exit system. (SHFWire photo by Andrés Rodríguez)

Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-Texas, questions the value and costs of the biometric exit system at a hearing Thursday. Department of Homeland Security officials estimate upward of $3 billion for the exit system. (SHFWire photo by Andrés Rodríguez)

Under the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004, DHS was required to  create a biometric entry and exit data system to match a physical component – fingerprints, facial image or iris scan – for foreigners who enter the U.S.

That would allow the country to track which visitors leave and which ones overstay their visas.

Border baseball massacre renews war fears

Frontera NorteSur

Many people in the Paso del Norte border region are asking this question: Who and what were responsible for the Sept. 22 massacre of 10 people in the rural Chihuahua town of Loma Blanca?  Was the killing revenge meted out against members of a winning baseball team? Part of the ongoing dispute between organized criminal bands over control of a strategic border smuggling corridor directly across from Texas? A case of mistaken identity, similar to the massacre of young people at a party in the Ciudad Juárez neighborhood of Villas de Salvarcar back in 2010?

Advocates target NM’s low child well-being ranking

Renee Blake

Kids Are Counting on Us logo. (Courtesy of NM Voices for Children via Public News Service.)

Kids Are Counting on Us logo. (Courtesy of NM Voices for Children via Public News Service.)

Public News Service – NM

ALBUQUERQUE — When it comes to the well-being of children in New Mexico, the Annie E. Casey Foundation ranks the Land of Enchantment dead last out of the 50 states.

Child advocacy groups, including New Mexico Voices for Children, are focused on solutions to the problems that create that situation. According to executive director Veronica Garcia, concrete actions can be taken to address issues that affect child well-being.

Volunteers keep watch on immigrant detainees

Amy Bracken

PRI’s The World via New America Media

It’s looking unlikely that Congress will take up immigration reform this fall. But the push is still on to put deportations and immigrant detention centers under the microscope. And some of those leading this effort are immigrants themselves—who’ve spent time in detention centers—and are organizing to support those still inside.

(Photo courtesy of New America Media)

(Photo courtesy of New America Media)

Luis Nolasco was nine when his parents brought him to California from Mexico.

Back then, his family’s “undocumented” status meant little to him, but that changed his senior year of high school.

deepens hed

Protesters in Mexico City gather on August 21 to denounce the education reform policies of President Enrique Peña Nieto. (Photo courtesy of Trojan Aeneas under Creative Commons license. License terms below.)

Protesters in Mexico City gather on Aug. 21 to denounce the education reform policies of President Enrique Peña Nieto. (Photo courtesy of Trojan Aeneas under Creative Commons license. License terms below.)

Protesters denounce reforms

Frontera NorteSur

Protesters in Mexico City. (Photo courtesy of Trojan Aeneas.)

Protesters in Mexico City. (Photo courtesy of Trojan Aeneas.)

Less than one year after taking office, the administration of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto faces serious challenges to its core policies. Leading the opposition are tens of thousands of public school teachers protesting the new No Child Left Behind-like law they contend will cost jobs,  aggravate educational inequities and lead to privatization.

The protest, which counts months now, is expanding in both scope and participation and more and more assuming the character of a multi-issue popular movement.

Increasingly, the teacher protest is transforming from a single-issue opposition to the education reform into a broad movement against the cornerstones of the Pact for Mexico, the political program promoted by President Peña Nieto and the leaders of the Big Three political parties, which implements controversial educational, labor, energy and taxation reforms.

Migrant workers’ march across U.S. for back pay ends in D.C.

Rosa Martha Zárate Macías, coordinator of the group of activists and former migrant laborers, says Thursday the Mexican government withheld 10 percent of migrant laborer’s earnings in savings accounts. The group ended their U.S stay in front of the White House. (SHFWire photo by Andrés Rodriguez)

Rosa Martha Zárate Macías, coordinator of the group of activists and former migrant laborers, says Thursday the Mexican government withheld 10 percent of migrant laborer’s earnings in savings accounts. The group ended their U.S stay in front of the White House. (SHFWire photo by Andrés Rodriguez)

Scripps Howard Foundation Wire

WASHINGTON – A group of elderly migrant laborers ended a cross-country protest Thursday outside the White House, hoping the U.S. would prod Mexico to pay money owed to them for work they did decades ago.

“We want Washington and the whole world to know that the Mexican government stole our money,” the group of 20 “ex braceros,” or migrant laborers, and activists sang. They ended their 22-day cross-country trip, demanding the U.S. government open the Bracero Program files and aid them in obtaining the 10 percent of their wages in savings accounts they claim the Mexican government never paid them.

Report: Persistent hunger remains a problem in New Mexico

A new USDA report shows that about nine-percent of households report being food "insecure" - meaning they can't afford enough food for a healthy active life.(Photo courtesy of USDA)

A new USDA report shows that about nine-percent of households report being food “insecure” – meaning they can’t afford enough food for a healthy active life. (Photo courtesy of USDA)

Renee Blake

Public News Service – NM

ALBUQUERQUE — New Mexico ranked 17th highest in food insecurity between 2010 and 2012. A new report from the USDA shows that more than 15 percent of households in New Mexico reported being “food insecure.” That is higher than the national ranking. 

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