Monthly Archives: February 2014

Severe drought sparks NM’s early wildfire season

Extremely dry conditions and strong winds are being blamed for starting New Mexico's fire season about two months earlier than normal. [Photo courtesy of NASA.]

Extremely dry conditions and strong winds are being blamed for starting New Mexico’s fire season about two months earlier than normal. [Photo courtesy of NASA.]

Troy Wilde

Public News Service | NM

ALBUQUERQUE – It appears that New Mexico may be in for a long and eventful fire season following a very early start. 

Living in the shadows: Detention center deaths raise immigrant rights questions

[Photo courtesy of New America Media.]

[Photo courtesy of New America Media.]

Alonso Yáñez

Univision/The California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowships  via New America Media

Juana Lopez squeezed her son’s hands and caressed his forehead.

“I’m here, mi’jo,” she said. “Your mom’s here. React. Try your best.”

That was the first time Lopez had seen her son in more than three months. That day, with her son unconscious and breathing with an artificial respirator inserted in him, was also the last day she saw Fernando alive.

NM exports to Mexico at record high

Troy Wilde

Public News Service | NM

After years of recession and job loss, there appears to be good economic news on the trade front for New Mexico.

After parents’ deportation, U.S. children face mental struggles

Myrna Orozco says that her therapist diagnosed her with PTSD, but she had to stop seeing the therapist because she could not afford it anymore. As an undocumented immigrant, Orozco could not avail herself of most public health services, including counseling. [Photo courtesy of Myrna Orozco.]

Myrna Orozco says that her therapist diagnosed her with PTSD, but she had to stop seeing the therapist because she could not afford it anymore. As an undocumented immigrant, Orozco could not avail herself of most public health services, including counseling. [Photo courtesy of Myrna Orozco.]

Anthony Advincula

New America Media

NEW YORK — Myrna Orozco will never forget the phone call she got from her cousin in October 2011.

Immigration officials had arrested her father and taken him to a detention center in Kansas City, where the family was living at the time. 

“I was in shock,” she said. “I immediately thought about my mother and my younger siblings, and what was going to happen to all of us.”

The Deportee Chronicles: Life after diesel therapy

Kent Paterson

Frontera NorteSur | FNS Feature

 Editor’s note: The second in a series of articles about the lives of U.S. deportees living in Mexico. Earlier: The girl from Guajajalmiton

Fernando Santos’ life these days doesn’t exactly fit his old nickname:“Drifter.” Instead of wandering the land, the former U.S. resident takes care of others who answer the call of the road at the budget hotel he manages in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.

Sunny prospects as Texas climbs rankings on solar jobs

The solar industry in Texas and nationwide continues to add jobs as a rapid pace. [Photo credit: Sean Loyless.]

The solar industry in Texas and nationwide continues to add jobs as a rapid pace. [Photo credit: Sean Loyless.]

John Michaelson

 Public News Service

The future is looking bright for the solar industry in the state and nationwide, with a record number now working in the field. According to Philip Haddix, manager of outreach and policy, The Solar Foundation, solar-industry employment grew by almost 20 percent since 2012, to reach 242,000 jobs across the U.S.

Poll: Western voters love their public lands

The latest "Conservation in the West" poll from Colorado College shows strong support among voters in the Mountain West for such federal public land agencies as the National Park Service. [Photo courtesy of Public News Service.]

The latest “Conservation in the West” poll from Colorado College shows strong support among voters in the Mountain West for such federal public land agencies as the National Park Service. [Photo courtesy of Public News Service.]

Doug Ramsey

Public News Service

Residents of the Rocky Mountain states want their public lands protected, and say candidates’ positions on conservation and land use could decide votes in this year’s elections. 

Hispanic stroke patients less likely to receive clot-busting drugs in border states

American Heart Association

Hispanic stroke patients admitted to hospitals in the border states of California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas were less likely than non-Hispanics in the same border states to receive clot-busting drugs and more likely to die, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2014.

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