Category Archives: Mexico news

On the trail of terrorists in Juárez

Mike Scanlon | Rio Grande Digital

Mike Scanlon is editor and publisher of Rio Grande Digital.

Mike Scanlon

A shadowy right-wing website caused a minor stir in the Paso del Norte region last week when it claimed — for a second time, citing anonymous “sources” — that a terrorist cell from the Islamic State organization was “camped” out in Juárez, or the Anapra suburb, to be precise, just eight miles from the border.

That can’t be right. First, there is no part of Anapra that is eight miles from the border. Anapra is literally on the border.

FNS: Daddy smelter’s dirty little souvenirs

Smokestacks tower above the site of the old Asarco smelter on El Paso's West Side.  (Photo from public domain)

Smokestacks tower above the site of the old Asarco smelter on El Paso’s West Side before the 2013 demolition and reclamation of the site. (Photo from public domain)

FNS Note:  The first in a new series of articles about environmental and public health concerns related to the old Asarco smelter in El Paso. This series was made possible by a grant from the Fund for Investigative Journalism.

 Kent Paterson | Frontera NorteSur

Near Executive Center Boulevard and Interstate 10 in El Paso sits a barren plot of land that played a pivotal if controversial role in the development of the border city. Flanked by freight rail traffic on one side and zooming cars and trucks on the other, black mounds of slag stand almost as if they are the earthworks of a DMZ between the past and the future.

Meth changes from domestic dilemma to international issue

The ingredients used to make methamphetamine create a reaction that is highly flammable and leaves toxic traces behind even after a clandestine lab is gone. (Pennsylvania National Guard photo by Sgt. Matt Jones.)

The ingredients used to make methamphetamine create a reaction that is highly flammable and leaves toxic traces behind even after a clandestine lab is gone. (Pennsylvania National Guard photo by Sgt. Matt Jones.)

Alicia Alvarez | Scripps Howard Foundation Wire

WASHINGTON – The methamphetamine problem in the United States is complex. It ranges from the simplicity of a clandestine lab in a Wal-Mart bathroom to a failed attempt at sending a drone carrying 6 pounds of the synthetic drug into the country over the border from Mexico.

Mexican drug trafficking organizations are moving to fill the void left by dismantled U.S. meth labs. Mexico’s regulations of meth’s key ingredients – pseudoephedrine, ephedrine and phenylpropanolamine products – are less strict than those in the U.S., where the sale of allergy and cold pills containing any of the decongestants was limited in 2006.

Democracy Now: Missing student’s father calls for ending US drug war aid to Mexico

15 Mexican police officers go down in ambush

Gunmen target Jalisco convoy amid wave of police-gang shootouts

Pan Am Post

A highway in the Mexican state of Jalisco erupted in gunfire on Tuesday, as unidentified gunman surprised a police unit in broad daylight around 3 p.m, killing 15 and wounding 5. The ambush is thought to have been in revenge for the shooting of a drug trafficker on March 23 in a police sting.

Organized crime targets higher education

Frontera NorteSur

Thousands of students with dreams of higher education have had their educational careers seriously disrupted in the northeastern border region of Mexico. In the state of Tamaulipas, for instance, extortion and threats of violence attributed to the Zetas and Gulf Cartel have forced the closure of the University of the Valley of Mexico (UVM) in Nuevo Laredo and the suspension of the school’s Reynosa branch.

UN investigator outs Mexico’s effort to whitewash torture report

UN Special Rapporteur on Torture Juan Méndez released a letter on April 1 alleging the Mexican government tried to pressure him into changing his report.  (Photo: UN / Mark Garten)

UN Special Rapporteur on Torture Juan Méndez released a letter on April 1 alleging the Mexican government tried to pressure him into changing his report. (Photo: UN / Mark Garten)

Special rapporteur: Human-rights violations go virtually unpunished

Elisa Vásquez | Pan Am Post

UN Special Rapporteur on Torture Juan Méndez says he was pressured by the Mexican government to alter the results of an investigation that determined torture in the country is “widespread” and goes virtually unpunished.

Commentary: The big business behind the US-Mexico border

The southern side of the US-Mexico border wall is a place for art and grim humor. (Taringa)

The southern side of the US-Mexico border wall is a place for art and grim humor. (Taringa)

The wall will continue to grow out of all proportion, because of the compromised political and economic interests involved.

Malgorzata Lange | Pan Am Post

Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) is already known for his controversial legislative proposals. So perhaps it’s not surprising that the launch of his campaign for the presidential ticket began with an earthquake, with reality mirroring an Alfred Hitchcock script. The rumblings of imminent disaster are likely to only increase.

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