Category Archives: Mike’s blog

Newspaper celebrates new home as another milestone quietly passes

Las Cruces Sun-News pressmen pause for a photo on Jan. 24, 2008, before starting the press to print the last daily newspaper ever printed in Las Cruces. After that night, printing was moved to El Paso, and the press was dismantled and moved to Farmington. (Rio Grande Digital photo by Mike Scanlon)

Las Cruces Sun-News pressmen pause for a photo on Jan. 24, 2008, before starting the press to print the last daily newspaper ever printed in Las Cruces. After that night, printing was moved to El Paso, and the press was dismantled and moved to Farmington. (Rio Grande Digital photo by Michael Scanlon)

Michael Scanlon | Commentary

The Las Cruces Sun-News building in downtown Las Cruces is contrary to today's trend of newspapers shedding their real estate assets. (Rio Grande Digital photo by Mike Scanlon)

The Las Cruces Sun-News building in downtown Las Cruces is contrary to today’s trend of newspapers shedding their real estate assets. (Rio Grande Digital photo by Michael Scanlon)

Rio Grande Digital 

Last week marked a milestone in journalism of the Paso del Norte region when the Las Cruces Sun-News — with much fanfare — opened its new building at the corner of Las Cruces Avenue and Alameda Boulevard.

Dignitaries gathered. A ribbon was cut. The governor said a few words. The revelry surrounding the new $1.3 million building eclipsed another milestone in the newspaper’s history that came and went without notice just four days earlier.

Website blasts ‘complicit lapdog media’

Editor laments lack of  ‘Occupy the Roundhouse’ coverage

Mike Scanlon

Rio Grande Digital

Grassroots Press, a Las Cruces-based website that focuses on social and environmental issues, had harsh words last week for New Mexico’s news media. At issue, said the website’s editor, Steve Klinger, was a lack of coverage of the Jan. 17 Occupy the Roundhouse rally at the state capitol in Santa Fe as the New Mexico Legislature opened a 30-day session.

I went to Juárez, and it was good to be there

Commentary

Mike Scanlon

Mike Scanlon

Rio Grande Digital

Two by two, truckloads of tetocops slowly crawled the side streets and alleys, their lights flashing red and blue. They crossed Avenida 16 de Septiembre about every two blocks. They were the Juárez city police — tetocops, as some people call them in a reference to Mayor Hector “Teto” Murguia.

An old man squeezed a melody from an accordion. A woman standing beside him brandished a cup for tips. A cabbie held his position on a Juárez Avenue corner. “Taxi, amigo? What are you looking for?”

Time fades some things, brightens others

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Old building evokes memories of a youthful explorer

Mike Scanlon

Mike Scanlon

Rio Grande Digital

I’m sure the photos I’ve taken of the old Kress Building in Downtown El Paso number in the thousands. I can visualize the photo I want, but it somehow always eludes my camera.

If I had the artistic eye and the technical knowledge of a great photographer — like my friend, Joel Salcido, for example — I’d have that photo after all these decades of trying. But what I’ve been able to put on film, or pixels nowadays, never has been the image that made me say, “That’s it!”

Why to get behind the Occupiers

Editor’s note: This column is my personal opinion. Whether you agree or disagree with it, your viewpoint is probably as valid as mine. I welcome your thoughts, which you can send to me as a “Letter to the Editor.” Please review our letters policy by clicking here or visiting the “Letters” category under the “Opinion” tab above.

Mike Scanlon

Mike Scanlon

Editor, Rio Grande Digital

When the Occupy Wall Street movement first began to stir this summer, its message seemed obscure. Initially — to the less attentive observer, anyway — there were but a few keywords, “corruption” and “greed” among them.

As the days and weeks drew on, images of the movement began to develop. Some saw it in a hopeful light with optimism that it could bring genuine change to our country — not the “Change” of empty campaign promises but real, palpable change. For others, the images harkened back to the anti-war protesters of the 1960s — a hairy, smelly nest of ungrateful hippies ready to pounce with disdain on returning war veterans.

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