Tag Archives: el paso

On the trail of terrorists in Juárez

Mike Scanlon | Rio Grande Digital

Mike Scanlon is editor and publisher of Rio Grande Digital.

Mike Scanlon

A shadowy right-wing website caused a minor stir in the Paso del Norte region last week when it claimed — for a second time, citing anonymous “sources” — that a terrorist cell from the Islamic State organization was “camped” out in Juárez, or the Anapra suburb, to be precise, just eight miles from the border.

That can’t be right. First, there is no part of Anapra that is eight miles from the border. Anapra is literally on the border.

FNS: Daddy smelter’s dirty little souvenirs

Smokestacks tower above the site of the old Asarco smelter on El Paso's West Side.  (Photo from public domain)

Smokestacks tower above the site of the old Asarco smelter on El Paso’s West Side before the 2013 demolition and reclamation of the site. (Photo from public domain)

FNS Note:  The first in a new series of articles about environmental and public health concerns related to the old Asarco smelter in El Paso. This series was made possible by a grant from the Fund for Investigative Journalism.

 Kent Paterson | Frontera NorteSur

Near Executive Center Boulevard and Interstate 10 in El Paso sits a barren plot of land that played a pivotal if controversial role in the development of the border city. Flanked by freight rail traffic on one side and zooming cars and trucks on the other, black mounds of slag stand almost as if they are the earthworks of a DMZ between the past and the future.

Ciudad Juárez: Bad day or a new bloodbath?

Frontera NorteSur

In one of the bloodiest days in the last year or more, nine people were murdered Monday, May 26, in the northern Mexican border city of Ciudad Juárez. In separate incidents, guns, knives, hammers and possibly bare hands were the instruments of homicide.

Border Patrol, hospital face lawsuit over cavity searches

John Michaelson | Public News Service

A lawsuit has been filed against the University Medical Center of El Paso and a number of its doctors, along with Customs and Border Protection and several agents for alleged abuses against a U.S. citizen. Senior staff attorney Adriana Piñon, ACLU of Texas, said the 54- year-old woman was returning to the U.S. last year when she was strip-searched at a border checkpoint and then taken in handcuffs to the medical center, where doctors probed her against her will.

High stakes, low turnout elections

Frontera NorteSur

Local politics was overshadowed by non-stop Washington dramas this fall, but important trends emerged and decisions were made in New Mexico and the Paso del Norte borderland that will chart the identity and destiny of the region for years to come. Yet in various contests, it was a distinct minority of the electorate that shaped future courses.

Land, migrants, poets: Day of the Dead 2013

Day of the Dead. (Photo courtesy of Fotos_Gratis via flickr under Creative Commons license. Terms below.)

Day of the Dead. (Photo courtesy of Fotos_Gratis via flickr under Creative Commons license. Terms below.)

Kent PatersonFNS Feature

New Mexico and the borderland will come alive this weekend with activities related to the annual Day of the Dead celebration, which

(Photo courtesy of Bob Mical via flickr under Creative Commons license. Terms below.)

(Photo courtesy of Bob Mical via flickr under Creative Commons license. Terms below.)

falls on Saturday, November 2, this year. As befits a cultural boom that is drawing in thousands and thousands of people, this year promises bigger and broader events than ever before, encompassing art, music, literature, and culinary treats.

“Without a doubt,” the growth of immigrant and Mexican populations on this side of the border is “exponentially” related to the expansion of the Day of the Dead, said Albuquerque poet and longtime community activist Jaime Chavez. The celebration honors the dearly departed through altars, music, food, and family and community gatherings.

Pivotal border elections

Frontera NorteSur | Special Report  

Voters in El Paso and Juárez have historic, if elusive, opportunities to influence the futures of two distinct yet inextricably linked sister cities. Although upcoming municipal elections will be held at a time when a convergence of economic, social and environmental forces is laying the groundwork for pivotal 21st century transitions, it’s likely the political outcomes in both cities will be decided by a distinct minority of the electorate.

Toxic ghosts of Asarco haunt region

The smokestacks at the old Asarco smelter in west El Paso tower over the Rio Grande before they were demolished in April.

The smokestacks at the old Asarco smelter in west El Paso tower over the Rio Grande before they were demolished in April.

Kent Paterson

Frontera NorteSur | FNS Feature  

Travelers familiar with El Paso-Ciudad Juárez might notice a gaping difference in the borderline skyline these days. Gone in the desert wind are the towering smokestacks of the old American Smelter and Refining Company, Asarco, of El Paso, blasted into the history books as part of an environmental remediation spearheaded by California-based Project Navigator.

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