Tag Archives: immigration

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott signs ‘sanctuary cities’ bill into law

Gov. Greg Abbott speaks on the first day of the 85th Legislature on January 10, 2017. [Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune]

Gov. Greg Abbott signed a ban on “sanctuary cities” on Sunday, putting the final touch on legislation that would also allow police to inquire about the immigration status of people they lawfully detain.

Patrick Svitek | Texas Tribune

Gov. Greg Abbott signed a ban on “sanctuary cities” into law on Sunday, putting the final touch on legislation that would also allow police to inquire about the immigration status of people they lawfully detain.

“Texas has now banned sanctuary cities in the Lone Star State,” Abbott said in a brief video address on Facebook. Abbott signed the bill without advance notice in a five-minute live broadcast on the social media site, avoiding protests a customary public signing might have drawn.

“We’re going to where most people are getting their news nowadays and talking directly to them instead of speaking through a filter,” said John Wittman, a spokesman for Abbott.

Across the state line in New Mexico, both the city of Las Cruces and Doña Ana County have adopted policies that forbid police and sheriff’s officers from inquiring about immigration status.

FNS: Dreamers, deportees and daredevils: Justice for migrant children and youth

 

The fence along the US-Mexico border is yet another symbol of the Unites States' broken immigration policy.

The fence along the US-Mexico border is yet another symbol of the Unites States’ broken immigration policy.

FNS Note: A review of the 11th Annual J. Paul Taylor Social Justice Symposium held last month at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces. This article is dedicated to the memory of Nohemi Alvarez Quillay.

Kent Paterson | Frontera NotrteSur

Maria Eugenia Ponce grew up in what she calls “Puebla York.” Brought to the Big Apple as a young girl in the 1990s, Ponce recalled her undocumented parents working very hard to pay for private schools so their children could get ahead in life. But as she became older, the daughter of migrants from the Mexican state of Puebla grew increasingly restive when she was told to be quiet and not draw attention to herself.

A little girl named Nohemi: Martyr of migration

Frontera NorteSur

On February 4, the grandparents of Jocelyn Nohemi Alvarez Quillay reluctantly saw the girl off from the family home in the province of Canar, Ecuador. Nohemi was embarking on a journey of thousands of miles to reunite with her parents, Jose Segundo Alvarez and Martha Violeta Quillay, who were reportedly living and working in New York City without papers.

By early March, Nohemi was sitting on the border of New Mexico within a stone’s throw of the United States.  Only a few days later, on March 11, she was found hanging in a bathroom of a Ciudad Juarez children’s shelter.

Nohemi was 12 years old.

A visionary’s dream for a violence-free land

Editor’s note: In continuing our series on gender and violence issues, Frontera NorteSur offers the second of two articles on a New Mexico community organization that struggles against domestic violence in the Spanish-speaking immigrant community.

Kent Paterson | Frontera NorteSur

Claudia Medina had little inkling of how her life path would change when she came to New Mexico a quarter-century ago. An older sister who had already settled in Santa Fe told her that the University of New Mexico (UNM) down the road in Albuquerque would be a good place for a Spanish-speaker to pursue graduate studies while mastering English.

Immigrant women rise against domestic violence

Editor’s note: In continuing our series on gender violence issues, Frontera NorteSur offers the first of two articles on a New Mexico community organization that struggles against domestic violence in the Spanish-speaking immigrant community.

Kent Paterson | Frontera NorteSur

Off a busy Albuquerque boulevard, one of the city’s most vital services goes on quietly with its work. Now 13 years old, Enlace Communitario, or Community Link, works non-stop to prevent and resolve domestic violence among the Duke City’s large, Spanish-speaking immigrant population.

NMSU to be host to immigration discussion

New Mexico State University

(Photo courtesy of New America Media)

(Photo courtesy of New America Media)

New Mexico State University’s Center for Latin American and Border Studies will host a community dialogue on immigration at 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 15, at the Nason House, 1070 University Ave.

Border biometric plan won’t be ready until 2015

Scripps Howard Foundation Wire

WASHINGTON – The number of foreign nationals who have overstayed their visas in the U.S. remains unknown, and Congress is pressuring the Department of Homeland Security for a solution.

Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-Texas, questions the value and costs of the biometric exit system at a hearing Thursday. Department of Homeland Security officials estimate upward of $3 billion for the exit system. (SHFWire photo by Andrés Rodríguez)

Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-Texas, questions the value and costs of the biometric exit system at a hearing Thursday. Department of Homeland Security officials estimate upward of $3 billion for the exit system. (SHFWire photo by Andrés Rodríguez)

Under the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004, DHS was required to  create a biometric entry and exit data system to match a physical component – fingerprints, facial image or iris scan – for foreigners who enter the U.S.

That would allow the country to track which visitors leave and which ones overstay their visas.

Volunteers keep watch on immigrant detainees

Amy Bracken

PRI’s The World via New America Media

It’s looking unlikely that Congress will take up immigration reform this fall. But the push is still on to put deportations and immigrant detention centers under the microscope. And some of those leading this effort are immigrants themselves—who’ve spent time in detention centers—and are organizing to support those still inside.

(Photo courtesy of New America Media)

(Photo courtesy of New America Media)

Luis Nolasco was nine when his parents brought him to California from Mexico.

Back then, his family’s “undocumented” status meant little to him, but that changed his senior year of high school.

Powered by WordPress