Tag Archives: Mexico City

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Protesters in Mexico City gather on August 21 to denounce the education reform policies of President Enrique Peña Nieto. (Photo courtesy of Trojan Aeneas under Creative Commons license. License terms below.)

Protesters in Mexico City gather on Aug. 21 to denounce the education reform policies of President Enrique Peña Nieto. (Photo courtesy of Trojan Aeneas under Creative Commons license. License terms below.)

Protesters denounce reforms

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Protesters in Mexico City. (Photo courtesy of Trojan Aeneas.)

Protesters in Mexico City. (Photo courtesy of Trojan Aeneas.)

Less than one year after taking office, the administration of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto faces serious challenges to its core policies. Leading the opposition are tens of thousands of public school teachers protesting the new No Child Left Behind-like law they contend will cost jobs,  aggravate educational inequities and lead to privatization.

The protest, which counts months now, is expanding in both scope and participation and more and more assuming the character of a multi-issue popular movement.

Increasingly, the teacher protest is transforming from a single-issue opposition to the education reform into a broad movement against the cornerstones of the Pact for Mexico, the political program promoted by President Peña Nieto and the leaders of the Big Three political parties, which implements controversial educational, labor, energy and taxation reforms.

The corporatization of street dealing

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A persistent narrative of narco issues south of the border maintains that violence is largely over the struggle to control drug routes leading into the dope-ridden United States, the world’s largest consumer of illegal drugs.

Yet, an increasing share of Mexican narco-violence can be attributed to conflicts over domination of the country’s own expanding domestic market. From Tijuana to Tapachula and from Monterrey to Mexico City, the internal market is thriving as sales of marijuana, cocaine, heroin, ecstasy and methamphetamine all meet a demand that’s soared since the early 1990s.

Message from Mexico: US pollutes water it may someday need to drink

By Abrahm Lustgarten

Water flows from a spigot to fill a bucket in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico.(Photo courtesy of Wonderlane via Flickr under Creative Commons license. Licence terms below.)

Water flows from a spigot to fill a bucket in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico.
(Photo courtesy of Wonderlane via Flickr under Creative Commons license. Licence terms below.)

 ProPublica

Mexico City plans to draw drinking water from a mile-deep aquifer, according to a report in the Los Angeles Times. The Mexican effort challenges a key tenet of US clean water policy: that water far underground can be intentionally polluted because it will never be used.

US environmental regulators have long assumed that reservoirs located thousands of feet underground will be too expensive to tap. So even as population increases, temperatures rise and traditional water supplies dry up, American scientists and policy-makers often exempt these deep aquifers from clean water protections and allow energy and mining companies to inject pollutants directly into them.

Mexico remembers 1968 Tlatelolco Massacre

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For the first time, the Mexican flag at the Chamber of Deputies building in Mexico City flew at half mast Oct. 2 in commemoration of the students gunned down by Mexican security forces in the Tlatelolco Massacre of 1968. 

Mexican truckers stage national protest

“We are Mexicans who have a right to dignified work and dignified treatment, as our Constitution establishes.”

Frontera NorteSur

Fed up with deepening economic and security problems, Mexican truckers conducted convoy protests that brought traffic to a crawl on some of the nation’s highways this week. Thousands of independent truckers affiliated with the Mexican Alliance of Transporter Organizations (AMOTAC) participated in actions in at least 12 states.

Mixed mood in Mexico as July 1 vote looms

Supporter of PRD candidate Andrés Manuel López Obrador displays campaign materials on June 23 in Calle Madero, Mexico City. Mexico will elect a new president and various other officials on July 1. (Photo courtesy Randal Sheppard via Flickr under Creative Commons license. License details below.)

PRI poised for return to Los Pinos

Virtually uncovered in the US press and given secondary treatment in the Mexican national media, the local and state elections will have important consequences for the distribution of power during the next several years, especially considering the enhanced autonomy of municipal and state governments in relation to federal authority.

Kent Paterson

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As Mexico’s political campaigns wind down in preparation for the big election day on July 1, mixed moods of doubt, anger, tension, confusion, excitement, exhaustion, resignation and hope grip the body politic.

FNS: Mothers march on Mexico City

Frontera NorteSur Special Report 

Mothers of women and men missing in Mexico embarked May 8 on a national march/caravan that will culminate in protests and meetings in the nation’s capital this week. Like last year’s caravans organized by poet Javier Sicilia and other relatives of violence victims, the mobilizations will remind Mexicans of the deep emotional wounds  and unhealed psychological scars that devour families of forcibly disappeared persons.

FNS: Super embassy on order

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The U.S. government is moving ahead with plans to construct a large new embassy in Mexico City. Slated for the upscale Polanco section of the Mexican capital, the planned complex is envisioned to cover about 13 acres on a plot of land that was purchased from the Colgate-Palmolive company.

Estimated to cost between $350 and $450 million, the new quarters for U.S. government agencies operating in Mexico are expected to be fully completed by 2019. In opening bids for the construction, Washington specified that the architecture had to conform with LEED Platinum green building designs.

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