Tag Archives: New Mexico State University

NMSU to host talk on issues of digital democracy and Internet usage

NMSU

Author and sociologist Jan A.G.M. van Dijk will visit New Mexico State University to give a talk on “Why the Digital Divide is not Getting Better,” at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 22, in the Health and Social Services Auditorium, Room 101A.

Jan A.G.M. van Dijk is a professor of sociology and communication science at the University of Twente in the Netherlands. (Courtesy photo)

Jan A.G.M. van Dijk is a professor of sociology and communication science at the University of Twente in the Netherlands. (Courtesy photo)

Van Dijk is a professor of sociology and communication science at the University of Twente in the Netherlands. He has been investigating the social aspects of information and communication technology since 1984. His research specializes in social, cultural and political/policy of the digital media.

In his talk, hosted by the Department of Communication Studies, van Dijk will be addressing issues of digital democracy, fallacies about Twitter revolutions and where political empowerment in Internet usage can actually be found.

“Professor van Dijk is a major world-known scholar on the digital divide,” said Kenneth Hacker, communication studies department head in the College of Arts and Sciences. “Any scholar, school administrator or state official concerned about inequities in computer, the Internet and new media access and usage should be there to meet and talk to him.”

NMSU host to Colombian students

Minerva Baumann | NMSU

From the jungles of Colombia to the fields of southern New Mexico, agriculture students who were once victims of the drug trade will visit New Mexico State University April 7-22 as part of its Partners of the Americas and the 100,000 Strong in the Americas Innovation Fund Grant.

“This project Utopia is a rural campus designed for youth who have been adversely affected by the drug industry,”

Blair Stringam, NMSU Plant and Environmental Sciences agricultural engineer, explained the function of a disk filter to one of the students at the Utopia project campus in Yopal, Colombia. (Photo by Mick O’Neill)

Blair Stringam, NMSU Plant and Environmental Sciences agricultural engineer, explained the function of a disk filter to one of the students at the Utopia project campus in Yopal, Colombia. (Photo by Mick O’Neill)

said Cornell Menking, NMSU associate provost for International and Border Programs. “We took our team down there for two weeks, as part of the grant they bring their team up here for two weeks.

“This program is a rising star in South America, they won the UNESCO Peace Award and an award from the president of the country.”

NMSU partnered with Universidad de La Salle in Bogota, Colombia, to win an Innovation Fund Grant last year. NMSU’s Office of International and Border Programs spearheaded the grant “Leaders Innovating for the Reinvention of an Agricultural Sustainable Region in Peace,” which proposed the exchange between students and faculty at NMSU and La Salle’s Utopia campus.

NMSU considers campus-wide smoking ban

The New Mexico State University campus (Photo courtesy of pyrosim the Archivist via Flickr under Creative Commons license. License terms below.)

The New Mexico State University main campus in Las Cruces. (Photo courtesy of pyrosim the Archivist via Flickr under Creative Commons license. License terms below.)

Troy Wilde | Public News Service – NM

Smoking on any New Mexico State University campus could become a thing of the past if a tobacco policy under consideration is approved. The Board of Regents is contemplating a measure that would ban tobacco use on all NMSU campuses.

NMSU to be host to immigration discussion

New Mexico State University

(Photo courtesy of New America Media)

(Photo courtesy of New America Media)

New Mexico State University’s Center for Latin American and Border Studies will host a community dialogue on immigration at 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 15, at the Nason House, 1070 University Ave.

NMSU researcher focuses on relation between border poverty, health

Rebecca Palacios

Rebecca Palacios

New Mexico State University

The area just north of the Mexican border has some of the highest poverty rates in the United States. And, according to one researcher at New Mexico State University, those poverty rates can be linked to poor health and higher mortality rates for people in the region.

NMSU Engineers Without Borders aid camp for homeless

Emily C. Kelley

New Mexico State University

Social workers typically know very little about planning and zoning laws, but Nicole Martinez, executive director of Mesilla Valley Community of Hope, has found herself taking a crash course on the subject in order to keep the 50 residents of Camp Hope, a tent community on the Community of Hope property, sheltered from the streets – and severe weather.

NMSU's Engineers Without Borders is helping the Mesilla Valley Community of Hope meet rezoning requirements for Camp Hope, a tent community for the homeless on the MVCH campus. (EWB courtesy photo)

NMSU’s Engineers Without Borders is helping the Mesilla Valley Community of Hope meet rezoning requirements for Camp Hope, a tent community for the homeless on the MVCH campus. (EWB courtesy photo)

“Each year, we lose homeless people to the elements and we didn’t want to see that happen,” Martinez said.

The Mesilla Valley Community of Hope is a center that serves the homeless and indigent in Las Cruces, offering a wide array of services and resources for those in need.

NMSU gets money to help migrant farmworker students

New Mexico State University

New Mexico State University student Pamela Prieto presents her poster at the third annual College Assistance Migrant Program Poster Expo last year. (Submitted photo)

New Mexico State University’s College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) is among a handful in the country selected to receive another five-year grant from the U.S. Education Agency’s Office of Migrant Education. The $2.2 million award will allow the university to continue helping students who are migratory or seasonal farmworkers or the children of these workers through their first year of college.

“We are very grateful to receive these federal funds,” said Cynthia Bejarano, principal administrator of the program. “There were 50 programs competing for this grant and only eight were re-funded. We also receive some funding from the state as well, but resources available to support these programs are shrinking and this has been a difficult year.”

NMSU program marks 10 years cultivating dreams

Participants in the DreamMakers program tour NMSU's Equestrian Center. (Submitted photo)

New Mexico State University

Children are often asked what they want to be when they grow up. Now, New Mexico State University’s DreamMakers program is teaching those children how their dreams can be accomplished through education. Approximately 80 students, parents and family members converged on the NMSU campus this week as the program started its 10th year.

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