Tag Archives: New Mexico

NM teams compete to bring solar power to underserved communities

Teams in New Mexico are competing for $1 million in prize money to bring solar to lower-income communities. (Flickr/Creative Commons)

Brett McPherson | Public News Service

SANTA FE – Low- and moderate-income households represent 40 percent of America’s population, but less than 5 percent of all solar customers. A national competition is underway to change that, by expanding affordable solar-power access.

A half-dozen teams from New Mexico are among 48 teams from 23 states and Washington, D.C., selected to compete for $1 million in prize money.

FNS: The Bloody Sundays of Albuquerque

Central Avenue in downtown Albuquerque. Photo courtesy of Ken Lund via Flickr under Creative Commons license. Terms blow.

Central Avenue in downtown Albuquerque. (Photo courtesy of Ken Lund via Flickr under Creative Commons license. Terms below.)

Petty drug disputes, gang rivalries, domestic violence, alcohol abuse, and male aggression against females ranked high on the list of identified and possible motives of violence.

Frontera NorteSur

The good news is that Easter Sunday came and went without a murder immediately reported in New Mexico’s four-county metro area.  The bad news is that, if the year’s homicide pace continues, the greater Albuquerque area could be facing its most violent year of the last five, based on a glance at statistics compiled by the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator (OMI). For 2010, the OMI pronounced 79 homicides in Bernalillo, Sandoval, Valencia and Torrance counties.

FNS: El Cerro de Tomé: A hill that unites

(Photo courtesy of Frontera NorteSur by Nicolas Cabrera)

(Photo courtesy of Frontera NorteSur by Nicolas Cabrera)

Nicolás CabreraFrontera NorteSur

In the borderlands, Good Friday is one of the most important days of the year. People across the region mark the solemn occasion in many ways, including long walks known as caminatas to pilgrimage sites.

In central New Mexico, there is a brown and dry hill that overlooks the green and fertile bosque of the Río Grande and the Village of Tomé. This giant hill, called the Cerro de Tomé, has three crosses at the top and is a pilgrimage site for thousands of people on Good Friday. Each person who makes the journey does so in his or her own way by carrying crosses, walking barefoot, singing, praying, or simply taking each step in silence.

NM to loosen ‘restrictions’ on cops

New training an overreaction to a nonexistent threat

Mike Scanlon

Rio Grande Digital | Commentary

In New Mexico — a state now famous for its anal-probing cops who force enemas and colon exams on innocent people — the police are likely to become even more aggressive with a new training program devised by a retired military officer.

Mike Scanlon

Mike Scanlon

This comes at a time when social media networks and news media brim with stories of police overreaction — fatal shootings of suspects, bystanders and family pets among them

And when the police do get called out for actions, their superiors dismiss complaints by saying something like, “The officers acted in accordance with their training.” And that’s that. End of story.

‘Flat tax’ would hurt low-income New Mexicans, group says

The state's poorest residents would be hit hardest by a proposed two-percent flat tax which may be considered New Mexico's next legislative session, according to New Mexico Voices for Children. (Photo courtesy of New Mexico Legislature.)

The state’s poorest residents would be hit hardest by a proposed two-percent flat tax which may be considered New Mexico’s next legislative session, according to New Mexico Voices for Children. (Photo courtesy of New Mexico Legislature.)

Troy Wilde | Public News Service

The state’s poorest residents would be hit hardest by a proposed 2-percent flat tax, according to Gerry Bradley, policy analyst, New Mexico Voices for Children. Bradley’s nonprofit organization is lobbying against the effort to replace personal and corporate state income taxes with the flat tax. 

A visionary’s dream for a violence-free land

Editor’s note: In continuing our series on gender and violence issues, Frontera NorteSur offers the second of two articles on a New Mexico community organization that struggles against domestic violence in the Spanish-speaking immigrant community.

Kent Paterson | Frontera NorteSur

Claudia Medina had little inkling of how her life path would change when she came to New Mexico a quarter-century ago. An older sister who had already settled in Santa Fe told her that the University of New Mexico (UNM) down the road in Albuquerque would be a good place for a Spanish-speaker to pursue graduate studies while mastering English.

Immigrant women rise against domestic violence

Editor’s note: In continuing our series on gender violence issues, Frontera NorteSur offers the first of two articles on a New Mexico community organization that struggles against domestic violence in the Spanish-speaking immigrant community.

Kent Paterson | Frontera NorteSur

Off a busy Albuquerque boulevard, one of the city’s most vital services goes on quietly with its work. Now 13 years old, Enlace Communitario, or Community Link, works non-stop to prevent and resolve domestic violence among the Duke City’s large, Spanish-speaking immigrant population.

High stakes, low turnout elections

Frontera NorteSur

Local politics was overshadowed by non-stop Washington dramas this fall, but important trends emerged and decisions were made in New Mexico and the Paso del Norte borderland that will chart the identity and destiny of the region for years to come. Yet in various contests, it was a distinct minority of the electorate that shaped future courses.

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