Tag Archives: NMSU

NMSU to host talk on issues of digital democracy and Internet usage

NMSU

Author and sociologist Jan A.G.M. van Dijk will visit New Mexico State University to give a talk on “Why the Digital Divide is not Getting Better,” at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 22, in the Health and Social Services Auditorium, Room 101A.

Jan A.G.M. van Dijk is a professor of sociology and communication science at the University of Twente in the Netherlands. (Courtesy photo)

Jan A.G.M. van Dijk is a professor of sociology and communication science at the University of Twente in the Netherlands. (Courtesy photo)

Van Dijk is a professor of sociology and communication science at the University of Twente in the Netherlands. He has been investigating the social aspects of information and communication technology since 1984. His research specializes in social, cultural and political/policy of the digital media.

In his talk, hosted by the Department of Communication Studies, van Dijk will be addressing issues of digital democracy, fallacies about Twitter revolutions and where political empowerment in Internet usage can actually be found.

“Professor van Dijk is a major world-known scholar on the digital divide,” said Kenneth Hacker, communication studies department head in the College of Arts and Sciences. “Any scholar, school administrator or state official concerned about inequities in computer, the Internet and new media access and usage should be there to meet and talk to him.”

NMSU host to Colombian students

Minerva Baumann | NMSU

From the jungles of Colombia to the fields of southern New Mexico, agriculture students who were once victims of the drug trade will visit New Mexico State University April 7-22 as part of its Partners of the Americas and the 100,000 Strong in the Americas Innovation Fund Grant.

“This project Utopia is a rural campus designed for youth who have been adversely affected by the drug industry,”

Blair Stringam, NMSU Plant and Environmental Sciences agricultural engineer, explained the function of a disk filter to one of the students at the Utopia project campus in Yopal, Colombia. (Photo by Mick O’Neill)

Blair Stringam, NMSU Plant and Environmental Sciences agricultural engineer, explained the function of a disk filter to one of the students at the Utopia project campus in Yopal, Colombia. (Photo by Mick O’Neill)

said Cornell Menking, NMSU associate provost for International and Border Programs. “We took our team down there for two weeks, as part of the grant they bring their team up here for two weeks.

“This program is a rising star in South America, they won the UNESCO Peace Award and an award from the president of the country.”

NMSU partnered with Universidad de La Salle in Bogota, Colombia, to win an Innovation Fund Grant last year. NMSU’s Office of International and Border Programs spearheaded the grant “Leaders Innovating for the Reinvention of an Agricultural Sustainable Region in Peace,” which proposed the exchange between students and faculty at NMSU and La Salle’s Utopia campus.

NMSU considers campus-wide smoking ban

The New Mexico State University campus (Photo courtesy of pyrosim the Archivist via Flickr under Creative Commons license. License terms below.)

The New Mexico State University main campus in Las Cruces. (Photo courtesy of pyrosim the Archivist via Flickr under Creative Commons license. License terms below.)

Troy Wilde | Public News Service – NM

Smoking on any New Mexico State University campus could become a thing of the past if a tobacco policy under consideration is approved. The Board of Regents is contemplating a measure that would ban tobacco use on all NMSU campuses.

Talk, photos focus on border ag workers

New Mexico State University

New Mexico State University’s Center for Latin American and Border Studies will present a talk and photo exhibit on the lives of agricultural workers in the U.S. and Mexico at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 13, at the Nason House, 1070 University Ave.

Joseph Sorrentino, a writer and photographer, will discuss what life is like for farm workers in upstate New York and southern New Mexico, as well as rural Mexico in his exhibit “Aqui y Alla: Agricultural Workers on Both Sides of the Border.”

NMSU to be host to immigration discussion

New Mexico State University

(Photo courtesy of New America Media)

(Photo courtesy of New America Media)

New Mexico State University’s Center for Latin American and Border Studies will host a community dialogue on immigration at 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 15, at the Nason House, 1070 University Ave.

Youth gardens can help address New Mexico’s food desert problems

Hidalgo County Extension Agriculture Agent John Allen examines okra plants growing in the Hidalgo County Youth Demonstration Garden in August. (NMSU photo by Emily C. Kelley)

Hidalgo County Extension Agriculture Agent John Allen examines okra plants growing in the Hidalgo County Youth Demonstration Garden in August. (NMSU photo by Emily C. Kelley)

Emily C. Kelley | NMSU

Nestled between railroad tracks and Interstate 10 in Lordsburg, N.M. is a brightly colored desert oasis. This collection of vegetable gardens is contributing to a cooperative solution for one of Hidalgo County’s biggest challenges: being designated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture as a food desert.

The colorful Hidalgo County Youth Demonstration Garden in Lordsburg, N.M., makes use of discarded materials to create functional garden beds. Dried yucca stems serve as a canopy to protect the plants from the harsh desert sun. (NMSU photo by Emily C. Kelley)

The colorful Hidalgo County Youth Demonstration Garden in Lordsburg, N.M., makes use of discarded materials to create functional garden beds. Dried yucca stems serve as a canopy to protect the plants from the harsh desert sun. (NMSU photo by Emily C. Kelley)

The USDA defines food deserts as “urban neighborhoods and rural towns without ready access to fresh, healthy and affordable food.” The map of food desert areas shows that much of the state of New Mexico is considered a food desert, with the exception of the areas immediately surrounding Las Cruces, Albuquerque and Santa Fe or sparsely populated areas of eastern New Mexico.

NMSU researcher focuses on relation between border poverty, health

Rebecca Palacios

Rebecca Palacios

New Mexico State University

The area just north of the Mexican border has some of the highest poverty rates in the United States. And, according to one researcher at New Mexico State University, those poverty rates can be linked to poor health and higher mortality rates for people in the region.

Wage theft across borders

Former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell addresses an audience at Bloom Energy's launch on Feb. 24, 2010. (Photo courtesy of Bloom Energy via Flickr under Creative Commons license. License terms below)

Former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell addresses an audience at Bloom Energy’s launch on Feb. 24, 2010. (Photo courtesy of Bloom Energy via Flickr under Creative Commons license. License terms below)

Frontera NorteSur

As discussion mounted over the issue of an expanded guest worker system in an immigration reform package, a company connected to former Secretary of State Colin Powell found itself in hot water in connection with the employment of Mexican workers in the U.S.

Farm workers toil in a field in July 2012 near Oxnard, Calif. (Photo courtesy of  Alex E. Proimos via Flickr under Creative Commons license. License terms below)

Farm workers toil in a field in July 2012 near Oxnard, Calif. Guest worker abuses are  said to be widespread, from lower-paid agricultural and service jobs to ostensibly professional-level nursing, teaching and high-tech positions. (Photo courtesy of Alex E. Proimos via Flickr under Creative Commons license. License terms below)

U.S. District Court Judge Lucy Koh recently ordered that Silicon Valley-based Bloom Energy Corporation fork out nearly $64,000 in back pay and damages to 14 workers from Chihuahua, Mexico, who were taken to California to refurbish power generators.

The court decision stemmed from a U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) probe that found the workers were paid in Mexican pesos the U.S. equivalent of $2.66 per hour, or a wage that is more typical of foreign-owned maquiladora plants in Mexico dedicated to manufacturing products for export.

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