Tag Archives: US-Mexico border

On the trail of terrorists in Juárez

Mike Scanlon | Rio Grande Digital

Mike Scanlon is editor and publisher of Rio Grande Digital.

Mike Scanlon

A shadowy right-wing website caused a minor stir in the Paso del Norte region last week when it claimed — for a second time, citing anonymous “sources” — that a terrorist cell from the Islamic State organization was “camped” out in Juárez, or the Anapra suburb, to be precise, just eight miles from the border.

That can’t be right. First, there is no part of Anapra that is eight miles from the border. Anapra is literally on the border.

Drownings spike along Rio Grande amid border crackdown

The Rio Grande is the natural frontier that separates the United States from Mexico. (Chacatorex)

The Rio Grande is the natural frontier that separates the United States from Mexico. (Chacatorex)

16 migrants dead in 6 months near Texas-Mexico border

Sabrina Martín | Pan Am Post

US Border Patrol has reported that the number of drownings in the Rio Grande — which separates Texas and four Mexican states — has grown dramatically in the last six months, as increased patrols force Mexican and Central American migrants to resort to dangerous methods to cross the border.

Raul L. Ortiz, deputy chief of Rio Grande Valley sector in Texas, told Associated Press that migrants were attempting to cross at new points in the river, leading to a spike in deaths in the river since October 2014.

Journalist Anabel Hernández to discuss drug war, journalism at UTEP

Mexican investigative journalist Anabel Hernandez. (Photo courtesy of Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung via Flickr under Creative Commons license. Terms below.)

Mexican investigative journalist Anabel Hernandez. (Photo courtesy of Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung via Flickr under Creative Commons license. Terms below.)

University of Texas at El Paso

Two events to explore the drug war and its impact on journalists will feature one of Mexico’s leading investigative journalists, Anabel Hernández. Hernández is a household name in her native country for being one of very few journalists willing to take on both the drug war and government corruption.

  • What: Mexican investigative journalist Anabel Hernández to speak about drug war and journalism in symposium and lecture
  • When: 4-6 p.m. Nov. 11; 4:30-6:30 p.m. Nov. 12
  • Where: Tomas Rivera Conference Center Nov. 11; Union Cinema Nov. 12

Land, migrants, poets: Day of the Dead 2013

Day of the Dead. (Photo courtesy of Fotos_Gratis via flickr under Creative Commons license. Terms below.)

Day of the Dead. (Photo courtesy of Fotos_Gratis via flickr under Creative Commons license. Terms below.)

Kent PatersonFNS Feature

New Mexico and the borderland will come alive this weekend with activities related to the annual Day of the Dead celebration, which

(Photo courtesy of Bob Mical via flickr under Creative Commons license. Terms below.)

(Photo courtesy of Bob Mical via flickr under Creative Commons license. Terms below.)

falls on Saturday, November 2, this year. As befits a cultural boom that is drawing in thousands and thousands of people, this year promises bigger and broader events than ever before, encompassing art, music, literature, and culinary treats.

“Without a doubt,” the growth of immigrant and Mexican populations on this side of the border is “exponentially” related to the expansion of the Day of the Dead, said Albuquerque poet and longtime community activist Jaime Chavez. The celebration honors the dearly departed through altars, music, food, and family and community gatherings.

Outrage follows migrant deaths in Arizona

Frontera NorteSur

The deaths of three young men in the Arizona desert last month have prompted Mexican non-governmental organizations to renew demands for actions and changes from the Mexican and U.S. governments. In a statement signed by scores of human rights, migrant, labor, civic, and faith-based organizations, the groups demanded meaningful policy shifts at a time when current U.S. legislative proposals for tighter security amount to a “virtual state of war on the border.”

Border leaders slam militarization

Besides roughly doubling the size of the Border Patrol from 20,000 to 40,000 agents,  Hoeven-Corker, named after its Republican  sponsors, would add 700 miles of border fencing, increase drone and high-tech surveillance and require Department of Homeland security certifications, among other measures, all to the tune of at least $46 billion during the next decade.

Frontera NorteSur

As was predicted, the procedural vote on moving forward the Hoeven-Corker amendment to the U.S. Senate’s immigration reform bill passed by a hefty majority (67-27) on Monday, June 24, paving the way for final approval of the legislation.

Border militarization by Congress threatens to derail immigration reform bill

The fence separating the United States and Mexico stretches across southern Arizona. (Photo courtesy of US Customs and Border Protection)

The fence separating the United States and Mexico stretches across southern Arizona. (Photo courtesy of US Customs and Border Protection)

“Congress has it exactly backwards — border security conflicts are just a symptom of failed immigration policy. Our elected leaders need to focus on crafting a more efficient, humane immigration system that reduces the pressure for destructive enforcement activities in our fragile borderlands.”

— Randy Serraglio, Center for Biological Diversity

Wage theft across borders

Former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell addresses an audience at Bloom Energy's launch on Feb. 24, 2010. (Photo courtesy of Bloom Energy via Flickr under Creative Commons license. License terms below)

Former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell addresses an audience at Bloom Energy’s launch on Feb. 24, 2010. (Photo courtesy of Bloom Energy via Flickr under Creative Commons license. License terms below)

Frontera NorteSur

As discussion mounted over the issue of an expanded guest worker system in an immigration reform package, a company connected to former Secretary of State Colin Powell found itself in hot water in connection with the employment of Mexican workers in the U.S.

Farm workers toil in a field in July 2012 near Oxnard, Calif. (Photo courtesy of  Alex E. Proimos via Flickr under Creative Commons license. License terms below)

Farm workers toil in a field in July 2012 near Oxnard, Calif. Guest worker abuses are  said to be widespread, from lower-paid agricultural and service jobs to ostensibly professional-level nursing, teaching and high-tech positions. (Photo courtesy of Alex E. Proimos via Flickr under Creative Commons license. License terms below)

U.S. District Court Judge Lucy Koh recently ordered that Silicon Valley-based Bloom Energy Corporation fork out nearly $64,000 in back pay and damages to 14 workers from Chihuahua, Mexico, who were taken to California to refurbish power generators.

The court decision stemmed from a U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) probe that found the workers were paid in Mexican pesos the U.S. equivalent of $2.66 per hour, or a wage that is more typical of foreign-owned maquiladora plants in Mexico dedicated to manufacturing products for export.

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